Events

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Nov
14
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Nov 14 all-day
Noon Hour Concert: V’la l’bon vent, v’la joli vent @ CGR
Nov 14 @ 12:30 pm – 12:30 pm

The KW Woodwind Quintet has chosen a program of delightful music by French composers to showcase the ‘jolie vent’ that wind instruments create. The concert will include Ravel’s Tombeau de Couperin, Debussy’s Children’s Corner, Bozza’s Scherzo, and Bizet’s Carmen Fantasie. Bienvenue à notre concert!

What keeps a community safe? “Untouchable” film screening/discussion
Nov 14 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Nov
15
Thu
2018
Resilience Summit: How Far We’ll Go from @BounceForwardWR @ The Family Centre
Nov 15 – Nov 16 all-day

Adversity is all around us. While some are able to bounce back, others struggle. Why the difference? That’s the question researchers studying resilience have been trying to answer, and their studies have identified several factors that can help people overcome the effects of adversity. The Resilience Project builds on those studies by seeking ways to add resilience factors to the lives of children, families and the community. When community organizations add an understanding of resilience in their programs, the benefits are multiplied. Attending this conference will enhance your work with children, youth and/or families as you learn more about what others are doing to support resilience and see ways to implement these strategies in your own area.

Join us on November 15th and 16th, 2018 to explore new research, hear speakers from local organizations and international organizations, and discover how to engineer resilience.

Lunch will be catered by Morning Glory Café, a community initiative by Ray of Hope. Morning Glory Café is a social enterprise designed to teach practical skills and positive work habits to young people who have experienced long-term difficulty obtaining and/or maintaining employment.

You won’t want to miss keynote speaker Robbie Gilligan from Dublin, Ireland who will share his findings about the role social services can plan in supporting the growth of resilience.

Keynote Address

Learn more about our keynote speaker, Robbie Gilligan.

Summit Schedule

See details about the How Far We’ll Go Summit

Workshop Descriptions

View the different workshops available

Meet the Presenters

Partners from The Resilience Project and other experts in the field of resilience will be offering workshops. 

Explore Kitchener Waterloo

Our suggestions on places to stay and eat, as well as things to check out while you’re in town!



Register Now

The Resilience Project

The Future of the European Union: A Perspective from the Balkans
Nov 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

The European Union has always been facing challenges since its conception, in a permanent creative tension among its Members States, between deepening and enlarging dynamics. During the last five years, crisis after crisis (real or perceived), European citizens have been increasingly questioning about the legitimacy, efficiency and even “Raison d’Etre” of such sui generis European configuration. More, some EU members are breaking some solidarity rules and move away from the “ever closer Union” moto which has been till recently a quasi-common objective. In addition, a new enlargement process is again also on the top of the European Commission for the six countries of the Western Balkans. In 2018, different initiatives have been taken to confirm the European trajectory of Serbia, Montenegro, Albania, Macedonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo, even if this may not happen before ten years.
But the European Union will be able to absorb such new demanding exercise? What is the current situation on the ground? What will be the conditions for such new step? In the European pre-electoral context, could we anticipate the main alternatives that we will face in the forthcoming months?
About the speaker
François Lafond, Adviser to the Deputy Prime Minister for European Affairs of Macedonia, based at Skopje. He was before for the last three years associate professor in Sciences Po Paris (Euro-American campus), lecturer at University of Paris-Sud and European consultant for IJL-Un Forum pour le Monde (2017). Previously, he was the executive director of EuropaNova (2013-2016), secretary general of the French Aspen Institute (2012-13), and director of the Paris office of The German Marshall Fund of the US (2008-2011). Before, François Lafond was a special adviser of the Italian Minister for Regional Affairs (2007-8), of the Italian undersecretary of State for Foreign Affairs (2006-7) in Rome. Former deputy director of Policy Network in London (2003-6), researcher of the think tank Notre Europe with Jacques Delors in Paris (1999-2003), research associate at the European University Institute’s Robert Schuman Centre in Florence (1995-9). He is also currently member of the agenda working group Halifax International Security Forum (Washington), International collaborator for Navigator Shipping Consultants Ltd (Athens), and a regular collaborator of European media (France 24, Challenges, Rai3 Mondo) and has a column in France Forum on European affairs and has translated from Italian to French the book from Sandro Gozi, Génération ERASMUS: ils sont déjà au pouvoir (Plon, May 2016). He has been honoured “Ufficiale dell’ordine della Stella d’Italia” in September 2014.

Aging as a Natural Monastery: Spirituality in Later Life
Nov 15 @ 4:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Join Bill Randall in considering the many respects in which aging is an inherently spiritual process—not religious necessarily, but spiritual (broadly defined). Despite prevailing perceptions of aging as a matter of inevitable decline, the challenges and changes that come with it can be experienced as Nature’s way of nudging us into the adventure of truly growing old (versus just getting old)—growing in insight, understanding, and compassion.

The presentation will be at 4 PM, followed by supper.

Contact Steinmann Mennonite Church at office@smchurch.ca or (519) 634-8311 by Friday, November 9 to reserve your spot. Cost: $20 cash, payable at the door.

Fill the Table Campaign Launch @ CGR
Nov 15 @ 4:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Join the Grebel community for a special ‘Fill the Table’ capital campaign launch event. You’ll be able to see the updated building plans that will enhance and expand our kitchen and dining room facilities. The short program will feature a few words from the architects, the board, the fundraising team, and students on the details and significance of this project. We’ll also share exciting news on our fundraising progress and provide updates on opportunities to get involved!

Refreshments will be provided. The program will begin promptly at 4:30pm.

Parking is free.

No RSVP necessary, but feel fee to contact Fred W. Martin, Director of Advancement at fwmartin@uwaterloo.ca.

We look forward to seeing you on November 15th!

Learn more about the Fill the Table capital campaign as well as the exciting plans for Grebel’s kitchen and dining room!

Nov
16
Fri
2018
Spirituality, Aging, and Narrative: The Sacred Art of Story Listening @ CGR
Nov 16 @ 8:30 am – 3:30 pm

Come explore the intersections between spirituality and narrative, and between narrative and aging, focusing on both the unique developmental tasks of later life, and the challenges aging poses to our stories. In the afternoon, speaker Bill Randall will introduce the sacred art of story listening and prepare participants to provide narrative care.

Register by Friday, November 9 to reserve your spot. Register Now
Please bring a lunch or enjoy local restaurants.

Nov
17
Sat
2018
Considering Matthew Shepard: UW Chamber Choir & Grand Philharmonic Chamber Choir @ HH
Nov 17 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

In October 1998, university student Matthew Shepard was targeted for his sexuality. He was kidnapped, severely beaten, tied to a fence and left to die in a lonely field.

Twenty years after that terrible event, we perform Craig Hella Johnson’s bold and transcendent work, which incorporates a variety of musical styles and texts, including passages from Matthew’s personal journal.

This is the first time this work will be performed in Canada.

Considering Matthew Shepard

University of Waterloo Chamber Choir
Grand Philharmonic Chamber Singers
Mark Vuorinen – Conductor

For advance tickets, please see GPH website.   

Prices: Under 30: $14; Regular:  $30.
Tickets also available at the door.

Nov
18
Sun
2018
Considering Matthew Shepard: UW Chamber Choir & Grand Philharmonic Chamber Choir @ HH
Nov 18 @ 3:00 pm – 3:00 pm

In October 1998, university student Matthew Shepard was targeted for his sexuality. He was kidnapped, severely beaten, tied to a fence and left to die in a lonely field.

Twenty years after that terrible event, we perform Craig Hella Johnson’s bold and transcendent work, which incorporates a variety of musical styles and texts, including passages from Matthew’s personal journal.

This is the first time this work will be performed in Canada.

Considering Matthew Shepard

University of Waterloo Chamber Choir
Grand Philharmonic Chamber Singers
Mark Vuorinen – Conductor

For advance tickets, please see GPH website.   

Prices: Under 30: $14; Regular: $30.
Tickets also available at the door.

Restorative Justice Week with Ray and Vi Donavan @ CGR
Nov 18 @ 7:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Conrad Grebel University College and Mennonite Central Committee Ontario are excited to be hosting Ray & Vi Donovan from the United Kingdom as guest speakers for Restorative Justice Week in November.  As parents of an 18 year old boy murdered in the street 16 years ago, they work passionately to give voice to a restorative justice approach, through education and creating system change in areas such as policing and probation.  

Save the date for two public events:

Sunday, November 18th at 7 – 9 pm
in The Great Hall, Grebel. 

November 26 – 28’The Power of Restorative Justice: Philosophy and Practice”
A three day skills training workshop led by Ray and Vi, offered as an elective in the Conflict Management Certificate Program.  Register by October 1st for the best available rate.

Restorative Justice Week with Ray and Vi Donavan @ CGR
Nov 18 @ 7:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Conrad Grebel University College and Mennonite Central Committee Ontario are excited to be hosting Ray & Vi Donovan from the United Kingdom as guest speakers for Restorative Justice Week in November.  As parents of an 18 year old boy murdered in the street 16 years ago, they work passionately to give voice to a restorative justice approach, through education and creating system change in areas such as policing and probation.  

Save the date for two public events:

Sunday, November 18th at 7 – 9 pm
in The Great Hall, Grebel. 

November 26 – 28’The Power of Restorative Justice: Philosophy and Practice”
A three day skills training workshop led by Ray and Vi, offered as an elective in the Conflict Management Certificate Program.  Register by October 1st for the best available rate.

Nov
20
Tue
2018
Regular Meeting for @WRNonviolence @ Queen Street Commons Cafe
Nov 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Our Weekly Meeting

WRN | Waterloo Region NonviolenceJoin us at the Queen St. Commons Cafe (43 Queen St. S., Kitchener, ON Map) on Tuesdays at 7:00pm. We discuss themes and organize activities for Nonviolence.

Let’s build a better world together!

Want additional info? Contact us at contact@wrnonviolence.org.

Nov
21
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Nov 21 all-day
Information Session: The Department of National Defence’s Policy Officer Recruitment Programme
Nov 21 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

The Policy Group at the Department of National Defence (DND) is currently conducting its 2018-2019 recruitment campaign for the Policy Officer Recruitment Programme (PORP), a three-year programme designed to recruit and develop talented individuals to meet the unique demands of the defence policy environment and become well-rounded Public Servants. Candidates selected for a PORP position are offered an indeterminate position with the Government of Canada at DND.
This presentation will offer interested students insights into the fascinating and multi-faceted work of the Policy Group in a busy department of the Government of Canada. The presentation will also allow potential candidates to understand the importance of clear applications, covering letters and resumes, and explain the challenges associated with interviews for a position with the Government of Canada.
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About the speaker
Anthony Ippolito is a Senior Policy Officer in the Department of National Defence’s Policy Group. During his time in the Policy Group to date he has served in several positions, including, among others, as a speechwriter to the Minister of National Defence and the Chief of the Defence Staff, as the officer responsible for Canada’s defence relations with NATO and several European nations, and as an officer on the team that manages DND’s relationship with the Parliament of Canada. He also deployed for seven months to the Middle East as the policy advisor on Operation IMPACT, Canada’s military contribution to the Global Coalition Against Daesh.
 

Public Forum — Adapting to Climate Change in Waterloo Region @ Balsillie School of International Affairs
Nov 21 @ 5:45 pm – 8:00 pm

Waterloo Jazz Festival tents blow away in the windstorm
The Region of Waterloo is consulting with a wide variety of local organizations and residents to develop a Community-wide Climate Adaptation Plan. This plan aims to help reduce the potential impacts of extreme weather and climate change to the community. Impacts could affect human health and safety, cause damages to properties and infrastructure, and negatively affect the natural environment.

By participating in this Public Forum, you will have an opportunity to:

Discover how climate change may affect Waterloo Region, and how these impacts can be addressed through the Region’s Community-wide Climate Adaptation Plan

Help shape the Plan by participating in an interactive activity, where you will have an opportunity to provide input and ideas on potential actions that the community can take to better prepare for climate change and extreme weather.

A light meal and refreshments will be served.

PRELIMINARY AGENDA

5:45 – 6:00 – Doors open, food and beverages available

6:00 – 6:30 – Introductory presentation, including an overview of the Community Climate Adaptation Plan and priority risks for Waterloo Region

6:30 – 8:00 – Interactive brainstorming activity

ADDITIONAL VENUE INFORMATION
view MAP

The event will be held in Room 1-42 at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, located in the CIGI Campus at 67 Erb Street West, Waterloo . Parking in the CIGI parking lot behind the building will be free for attendees of this event.

Space is limited, so please register if you would like to attend.
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/public-forum-adapting-to-climate-change-in-waterloo-region-tickets-51476361182

The Manitoba Story: A Basic Income Film and Panel Presentation @ David Braley Health Sciences Centre Auditorium
Nov 21 @ 6:45 pm – 9:00 pm

The Manitoba Story: A Basic Income Film & Panel Presentation
Hamilton Basic Income Group and The Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction invite you to attend this free basic income film screening and panel presentation on November 21st from 6:45 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

From 1974-1979 the first full-scale pilot of a Universal Basic Income was implemented in Manitoba. During the experiment, every resident of the small town of Dauphin was eligible to receive unconditional cash, just for signing up. The project was called Mincome. The results of Mincome, buried for 40 years, are brought to light in this documentary – a Truth Be Told film.

Panelists:

DR. EVELYN FORGET
Health Economist, University of Manitoba and Author of The Town With No Poverty and Basic Income for Canadians: The key to a healthier, happier, more secure life for all

RON HIKEL
Executive Director of the Mincome project from 1974 to 1978

LIVING PROOF SPEAKERS
Hamilton participants in the Ontario Basic Income Pilot

Humans of Basic Income portraits by photographer Jessie Golem

Wednesday, November 21, 6:45 – 9:00PM

Free event
REGISTER for this free event on Bruha
https://www.bruha.com/event/4036

WRN supplementary meeting @ Coffee Culture
Nov 21 @ 6:45 pm – 9:15 pm
Monthly Meeting: Council of Canadians, Kitchener-Waterloo Chapter @ Community Room, Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes
Nov 21 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Kitchener-Waterloo chapter ofThe Council of Canadians - Acting for Social Justice | Le Conseil des Canadiens - Agir pour la Justice Sociale Council of Canadians meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in the Community Room at Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes, 307 Queen St S. (corner of Queen and Courtland), Kitchener.

There’s parking, but check with the organizers to get a permit.

Current topics include electoral reform, the Nestle boycott, and the
TPP and other trade deals.

All are welcome! For info please contact KW.cofc@gmail.com. Follow @kwcofc on Twitter.

Nov
22
Thu
2018
Justice and Reconciliation in World Politics
Nov 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Justice and Reconciliation in World Politics is a study in normative and critical theory of how to conceptualize practices of justice and reconciliation that aim to respond to colonial injustices in international and transnational contexts. Examining cases of colonial war, genocide, forced sexual labour, forcible incorporation, and dispossession, this book highlights the structural injustices involved in colonialism, based on race, class, and gender, and shows that interactional practices of justice and reconciliation have been inadequate in redressing these structural injustices. The book argues that contemporary moral/political projects of justice and reconciliation in response to the persistent structural injustices of a colonial international order entail strategies of decolonization, decentering, and disalienation that go beyond interactional practices of accountability and reparation, beyond victims and perpetrators, and beyond a statist world order.
About the speaker
Catherine Lu is Associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University, and Coordinator of the Research Group on Global Justice of the Yan P. Lin Centre. Her research and teaching interests intersect political theory and international relations, focusing on critical and normative studies of humanitarianism and intervention in world politics; theories and practices of justice and reconciliation; colonialism and structural injustice; and cosmopolitanism, global justice, and the world state. She is the author of Justice and Reconciliation in World Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2017), and Just and Unjust Interventions in World Politics: Public and Private (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).

Japan as a ‘Normal Country’? Retrospect and Prospect
Nov 22 @ 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm

This event is open to the Balsillie School and CIGI community only. To register for the public event, visit “Japan’s Future Global Role: A New Dawn for the Land of the Rising Sun?“.
There is an ongoing debate about whether Japan is – and if not, whether it can or should become – a “normal country.” For decades the received wisdom has been that Japan – at least in its international presence – lacked something vitally necessary for it to be taken seriously and treated with the respect befitting a country of its size and sophistication. Is Japan a “normal” country? If not, in what sense is it not, and what are the prospects for Japan’s “normalization”?
Agenda
14:00 – 14:15 Welcoming remarks by Dr. John Ravnehill, Director, BSIA and Ms. Takako Ito, Consul-General of Japan in Toronto
14:15 – 15:15 Presentations by Dr. Yoshihide Soeya and Dr. Masayuki Tadokoro, Keio University, and Dr. David Welch, BSIA, CIGI and Japan Futures Initiative
15:15 – 16:15 Q&A
16:15 – 16:30 Closing remarks by Dr. Rohinton Medhora, President, CIGI and Ms. Takako Ito, Consul-General of Japan in Toronto
This event is presented as a partnership between the Balsillie School of International Affairs, the Centre for International Governance Innovation and the Japan Futures Initiative.
About the speakers
Yoshihide Soeya is Professor of political science and international relations at the Faculty of Law of Keio University. His areas of interest are politics and security in East Asia, and Japanese diplomacy and its external relations. He received Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1987, majoring in world politics. He served as the Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies of the same university for six years until September 2013, and as the Director of its Center for Contemporary Korean Studies for five years until March 2016. Recently, Dr. Soeya was a Japan Scholar of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. from September 2013 to January 2014, and a Korea Foundation Fellow affiliated with the ASAN Institute in Seoul in March-May 2014. His most recent publications in English include “The Rise of China in Asia: Japan at the Nexus,” in Asle Toje, ed., Will China’s Rise be Peaceful? Security, Stability, and Legitimacy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), and “The Case for an Alternative Strategy for Japan: Beyond the Article 9-Alliance Regime,” in Michael J. Green and Zack Cooper, eds., Postwar Japan: Growth, Security and Uncertainty since 1945 (Washington D.C.: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2017).
Masayuki Tadokoro is Professor of International Relations at Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. Born in Osaka, he attended Kyoto University and the London School of Economics. Previously he was a professor at the National Defense Academy. In 1988-89, he stayed in Washington D.C. a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, and in 1991 he taught for a semester as Fulbright Scholar in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh. His primary field is international political economy, but he works also on Japanese foreign and security policy. His publications in English include, “After the Dollar?”, International Relations of the Asia Pacific 10:3 (2010); and “Why did Japan fail to become the ‘Britain’ of Asia”, in David Wolff et al., eds., The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective (Brill, 2007). He also edited with David Welch and Yoshihide Soeya, Japan as a ‘Normal Country’?: A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World, (Toronto U.P. 2011).
David Welch is a CIGI senior fellow and professor of political science at the University of Waterloo located at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. An award-winning author and scholar, David is an expert in foreign policy decision making and international security, with an emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region.

Reducing your Carbon Footprint 101: Project Neutral Series
Nov 22 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

Learn more about Project Neutral and Reep
Project Neutral is known for its community-focused, carbon benchmarking and climate action tool. Project Neutral allows anyone to find out their carbon footprint in 5 minutes, based on real local data.
Stay tuned for more details on improving your carbon impact in your home and waste!
Home Energy 101
Date: | Thursday, November 22
Time | 5:30pm – 7:00pm
 
Diving into Waste 101
Date: | Thursday, December 13
Time | 5:30pm – 7:00pm
 
Note: This is an interactive event and you will need a phone/tablet/computer to participate!

Alicia Parkin, Customer Engagement and Outreach Coordinator, Reep Green Solutions

 
Alicia is passionate about teaching people how to find their carbon footprint, and what their next steps are for living a sustainable life. She is the Customer Engagement and Outreach Coordinator for In-Home Energy Services at Reep Green Solutions. One of her lead roles at Reep is to help launch the Project Neutral tool into the Waterloo Region and find like-minded community members to help connect others with this tool. Alicia has a Bachelor’s degree from Carleton University in Environmental Studies and a minor in Political Science.

 
Transportation
We encourage the use of active transportation such as walking or biking. The house is just off the Iron Horse Trail. It is also easily accessible by GRT bus routes that use Queen and have stops near Mill St. If you drive, please consider carpooling with others you know are attending.
Parking
You are welcome to use Schneider Ave or David Street parking. The Victoria Park Pavilion parking lot is also free to use and only a few minutes walk to the Reep House. Please do not park at the Schneider Haus or Mitchell St lots (click to enlarge map)

Japan’s Future Global Role: A New Dawn for the Land of the Rising Sun?
Nov 22 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

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The world is entering a period of great geopolitical uncertainty and potential instability. Under Donald Trump, the United States is systematically undermining the pillars of the international order that it largely built and on which its global influence depends. Cracks are beginning to show in the foundations of China’s rise. Brexit is threatening to diminish both Britain and the European Union. Russia continues to try to undermine Western liberal democracy and destabilize its hinterland. Amidst these worrying trends and developments, Japan stands as a beacon of prosperity and stability. Can it assume a global role commensurate with its wealth and power? What would a Japan-led international order look like? This event is presented as a partnership between the Balsillie School of International Affairs, the Centre for International Governance Innovation and the Japan Futures Initiative.
About the speakers
Yoshihide Soeya is Professor of political science and international relations at the Faculty of Law of Keio University. His areas of interest are politics and security in East Asia, and Japanese diplomacy and its external relations. He received Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1987, majoring in world politics. He served as the Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies of the same university for six years until September 2013, and as the Director of its Center for Contemporary Korean Studies for five years until March 2016. Recently, Dr. Soeya was a Japan Scholar of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. from September 2013 to January 2014, and a Korea Foundation Fellow affiliated with the ASAN Institute in Seoul in March-May 2014. His most recent publications in English include “The Rise of China in Asia: Japan at the Nexus,” in Asle Toje, ed., Will China’s Rise be Peaceful? Security, Stability, and Legitimacy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), and “The Case for an Alternative Strategy for Japan: Beyond the Article 9-Alliance Regime,” in Michael J. Green and Zack Cooper, eds., Postwar Japan: Growth, Security and Uncertainty since 1945 (Washington D.C.: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2017).
Masayuki Tadokoro is Professor of International Relations at Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. Born in Osaka, he attended Kyoto University and the London School of Economics. Previously he was a professor at the National Defense Academy. In 1988-89, he stayed in Washington D.C. a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, and in 1991 he taught for a semester as Fulbright Scholar in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh. His primary field is international political economy, but he works also on Japanese foreign and security policy. His publications in English include, “After the Dollar?”, International Relations of the Asia Pacific 10:3 (2010); and “Why did Japan fail to become the ‘Britain’ of Asia”, in David Wolff et al., eds., The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective (Brill, 2007). He also edited with David Welch and Yoshihide Soeya, Japan as a ‘Normal Country’?: A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World, (Toronto U.P. 2011).
David Welch is a CIGI senior fellow and professor of political science at the University of Waterloo located at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. An award-winning author and scholar, David is an expert in foreign policy decision making and international security, with an emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region.

Nov
23
Fri
2018
Resumé and Cover Letter Writing
Nov 23 @ 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

MA Global Governance students are invited to participate in this professional development session led by the Centre for Career Action at the University of Waterloo.

Balinese Gamelan Ensemble Concert @ HH
Nov 23 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Gamelan is the traditional ensemble music of Java and Bali in Indonesia, made up predominantly of percussive instruments. It is taught without notation, which means the students have to memorize their parts. Directed by artist-in-residence I Dewa Made Suparta, the group plays both traditional Balinese music and modern compositions.
This group of approximately 20 students will have an end of term concert at Hagey Hall.  Admission is free, and the concert is suitable for all ages.  An opportunity to try the instruments out will be made available at the end of the concert.