Events

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Sep
18
Wed
2019
Monthly Meeting: Council of Canadians, Kitchener-Waterloo Chapter @ Community Room, Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes
Sep 18 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Kitchener-Waterloo chapter ofThe Council of Canadians - Acting for Social Justice | Le Conseil des Canadiens - Agir pour la Justice Sociale Council of Canadians meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in the Community Room at Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes, 307 Queen St S. (corner of Queen and Courtland), Kitchener.

There’s parking, but check with the organizers to get a permit.

Current topics include electoral reform, the Nestle boycott, and the
TPP and other trade deals.

All are welcome! For info please contact KW.cofc@gmail.com. Follow @kwcofc on Twitter.

The Trudeau Formula: Seduction and Betrayal in an Age of Discontent
Sep 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Photo credit: Presidencia de la Republic/Flickr
Just in time for the fall federal election, Martin Lukacs is launching his new book, which unpacks the failings of the Trudeau government and illuminates the kind of politics we need instead: one where Canada’s progressive majority works together to confront inequality, racism, and the climate crisis.
About the speaker
Martin Lukacs is an investigative journalist who has covered Canadian politics for more than a decade. He has been an environmental writer for The Guardian, and was a co-author of the Leap Manifesto. He lives in Montreal and occasionally visits Twitter.

Sep
19
Thu
2019
Designing Humanitarian Goods: Refugee Shelter in a Logistical World
Sep 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Photo credit: Better Shelter via MyNewsDesk
Focusing on the IKEA Foundation-sponsored “Better Shelter” kit, the paper explores the role of logistical calculative rationales in the design and usage of portable refugee housing. An engagement with the critical geographies of logistics, it is argued, expands debates on such “humanitarian goods” in two main ways. First, it highlights the organizational and infrastructural connectors that shape the way in which shelter products circulate across production sites, camps, and disaster zones, and relate to other humanitarian objects and broader infrastructures. Second, a logistical and counter-logistical lens unveil the multifarious forms of labour and extraction involved in the production, shipping, assemblage and usage of emergency shelter products. The article thus problematizes prevalent imaginaries of fluidity, smoothness, and remoteness associated with humanitarian goods, and contributes to an emergent body of work that see humanitarian technology and design as sites of frictions and “stickiness”, deeply embedded in global processes of bordering and accumulation.
About the speaker
Elisa Pascucci (PhD Sussex, UK) is Academy of Finland Postdoctoral Researcher at the EuroStorie Centre of Excellence, Faculty of Humanities, University of Helsinki. She is a social scientist specializing in migration and humanitarian studies, whose research interests include migrant and refugee political agency and mobilization, the social effects and everyday politics of border regimes, and humanitarian infrastructures and logistics in the Mediterranean and Middle East. She is also affiliated researcher in the project HUMBorders, funded by the Norwegian Research Council and based at the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), which focuses on humanitarian and border governance practices emerging in Europe as a result of the crisis of refugee reception of 2015-2016. Her work has been published, among others, in the journals Global Networks, Area, International Political Sociology and Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space.

Canadian Premiere of “Chauka, Please Tell Us the Time”
Sep 19 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Photo credit: Timm Gunn, courtesy of the IMRC
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“Chauka, Please Tell Us the Time” is a powerful documentary shot clandestinely on a smartphone by Behrouz Boochani inside Australia’s Manus Island detention centre in Papua New Guinea. Footage was sent electronically to Arash Kamali Sarvestani, who wove it together with interviews shot outside the detention centre to create the film.
After the film is screened, the IMRC will host a Q & A session with filmmakers Sarvestani (in person) and Boochani (remotely from Manus Island).
About the filmmakers
Behrouz Boochani is an Iranian-Kurdish journalist, activist, and poet. In addition to his work on “Chauka,” he has published a memoir, “No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison,” which was written on a mobile phone using What’s App. Awards he has received for the book include the Victorian Prize for Literature, the Victorian Premier’s Prize for Nonfiction, a special award in the New South Wales Premier’s Literary Awards, the Australian Book Industry Award (ABIA) for General non-fiction book of the year, and the Australian National Biography Award.
Arash Kamali Sarvestani is an Iranian Dutch filmmaker and video artist. He studied film at the Art University of Tehran and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. His work has been featured in numerous festivals in Europe and Iran. He currently lives and works in the Netherlands.
Questions about the event can be sent to imrc@wlu.ca.

Sep
20
Fri
2019
Transformative Mediation Training
Sep 20 @ 8:30 am – Sep 21 @ 4:30 pm
Sep
24
Tue
2019
Agency Orientation
Sep 24 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Sep
26
Thu
2019
Cosmopolitan Sex Workers: Women and Migration in a Global City
Sep 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Photo: pxhere/Creative Commons License
Christine BN Chin, Dean of American University’s School of International Service, will discuss her book, Cosmopolitan Sex Workers. The book provides a groundbreaking look into the phenomenon of non-trafficked women who migrate from one global city to another to perform paid sexual labor in Southeast Asia. Through a new, innovative framework, Chin shows that as neoliberal economic restructuring processes create pathways connecting major cities throughout the world, competition and collaboration between cities creates new avenues for the movement of people, services and goods. Loosely organized networks of migrant labor grow in tandem with professional-managerial classes, and sex workers migrate to different parts of cities, depending on the location of the clientele to which they cater. 
About the speaker
 Dr. Christine BN Chin is the first woman to become dean of SIS, a top ten ranked school of international affairs and the largest of its kind in the US.
 Dr. Chin is an internationally renowned and award-winning scholar of global migration studies, offering path-breaking scholarship on the intersections of gender, class, race/ethnicity and nationality. Her book, Cosmopolitan Sex Workers: Women and Migration in a Global City (2013), earned several awards, including the Distinguished Book Award from the Political Economy of the World-System Section of the American Sociological Association, and the Yale H. Ferguson Award from the International Studies Association-Northeast. Dr. Chin earned her PhD at American University’s School of International Service, her MA from University of California, Berkeley, and her BA from Wellesley College.
 Dr. Chin is also an award-winning teacher. She has received teaching awards at the school and university levels, as well as earning the American Political Science Association’s Campus Teaching Award Recognition. As an educator committed to the ultimate ideals of high impact teaching and learning, Dr. Chin has worked very closely with the Office of Merit Awards to field numerous students for national and international merit competitions such as the Marshall, Fulbright, and Rhodes scholarships.
 In recent years, Dr. Chin has served on multiple school and university-wide committees including the university’s budget committee and the President’s Council. She has been co-leading a special working group on the future of online education at AU and has involved SIS in innovative collaborations with Kogod School of Business and the Washington College of Law. While serving as interim dean during the 2017–18 academic year, was on leave from her position as executive director of AU’s Center for Teaching, Research, and Learning (CTRL), and she served previously as director of SIS’s International Communications program. She has a track record of steadfast commitment to diversity and inclusion at the institutional and individual levels.

Oct
2
Wed
2019
Influencing Change at the Global Level: Q&A on Adapting to the Crisis in Global Governance
Oct 2 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Photo credit: Garry Knight/flickr
This event is open to faculty and students of the BSIA only.
The rise of Trump, Brexit, populism and the retreat from international institutions are jeopardising the progress made on development and climate by NGOs and movements over the past few decades. As a result, the global advocacy industry is struggling to adapt strategies and devise new tactics to continue to influence decision-makers to safe-guard and advance progress.
About the speaker
Kel Currah has worked in global advocacy for twenty years working on the WTO in the late 90s, Make Poverty History in the mid-2000s and the G7 and G20 Summits over the past 10 years. He has worked for World Vision International and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and currently runs a global advocacy consultancy – What World Strategies that works with NGOs, foundations and UN agencies on advocacy initiatives. He will share his experience from the golden age of advocacy to today’s crisis in global governance in a discussion on the current state of change for development and climate.

Stride Night Training @ Ontario
Oct 2 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Please note that before you register for the Stride Night training you must first attend a screening interview.  To arrange a time for a screening interview please contact Alison at 519-744-6549 ext: 125 or at alisonh@cjiwr.com

Waterloo Symposium on Technology & Society: Search and Discover – What The Internet and Big Data Reveal About Who We Are
Oct 2 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

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How can Google search terms help predict elections? How many white Americans voted against Obama simply because he was black? Are crime rates affected by violence in the media? Are boys secretly favored over girls amongst parents? For Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, the answer to these questions doesn’t lie in traditional polls, but in the billions of Google searches we make every day. Through his original research with search terms and big data, he’s discovered—and predicted—a number of counterintuitive insights, often that fly in the face of conventional wisdom. And in this surprising keynote, he lays out just what big data can reveal about our biases, anxieties, and hidden desires—and how Internet searches can provide answers to questions we’re often too afraid to ask. Though sometimes uncomfortable, these revelations are designed to help us understand the world with more accuracy. And they’re here to help us become smarter consumers of data, based on asking better questions. It’s about what people are actually doing, Stephens-Davidowitz argues—not what they say they want to do.
Keynote Speaker
Seth Stephens-Davidowitz has used the Internet to find groundbreaking insights into advertising, sports, sexuality, health, and many other aspects of 21st century life. His debut book Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are summarizes this research, arguing that much of what we thought from traditional, offline data sources has been dead wrong. A breakout success, Everybody Lies was named an Economist Best Book of the Year, a PBS NewsHour Book of the Year, an Entrepeneur Top Business Book, and an Amazon Best Book of the Year in Business and Leadership. It’s also a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller. The Economist describes it as “a whirlwind tour of the modern human psyche using search data as its guide,” while renowned psychologist Steven Pinker, who wrote the book’s forward, argues that Stephens-Davidowitz’s work points to “a new path for social science in the 21st century.”
Seth is a contributing op-ed writer for the New York Times and has worked as a visiting lecturer at the Wharton School and a data scientist at Google. He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard and a BA in Philosophy from Stanford, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa.
Panelists
Rozita Dara is an Assistant Professor at the School of Computer Science in the University of Guelph. Prior to her academic appointment, she worked at Ontario’s Office of the Information Privacy Commissioner (IPC) as Privacy and Information Technology Officer. Rozita is the Chair of IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology Chapter in the IEEE KW Section.
Bianca Wylie is a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation. She also leads work on public sector technology policy for Canada at Dgen Network and is the co-founder of Tech Reset Canada. She has a dual professional background in technology and public engagement, having worked at both Thomson Reuters and Swerhun Facilitation.
Jonathan A. Obar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at York University. He also serves as a Research Associate with the Quello Center for Telecommunication Management and Law at Michigan State University, where he previously worked for four years. His teaching and research focus on information and communication policy, and the relationship between digital technologies, civil liberties and the inclusiveness of public culture.
BSIA faculty and students should contact the organizer (Mark Sedra, msedra@secgovcentre.org) directly for a ticket. 

Oct
4
Fri
2019
Freedom of Expression in Canada
Oct 4 @ 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Photo credit: Saffron Blaze
SOLD OUT!
This workshop is co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, the Courts & Politics Research Group, and the research cluster for Indigenous Peoples, Decolonization and the Globe at the Balsillie School of International Affairs.
Agenda and Presenters
 
 

Oct
10
Thu
2019
Navigating Borders: How Rejected Asylum Seekers Resist Local Border Experience
Oct 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Photo credit: 3 Rosen Gegen Grenzen
Asylum seekers whose asylum requests are denied and who do not follow the order to leave the country are deemed “illegal” in Switzerland. While lacking formal residence status, their presence and stay are known to the immigration authorities. However, they cannot work, have a bank account or rent a home and are excluded from what Arendt calls the basic “right to have rights.”
With an engaged ethnographic approach, this presentation brings attention to the ways illegalised migrants experience and contest local bordering processes in public spaces, prisons and camps. First, it sketches out the political mechanisms that produce an invisible carceral environment and detention structures to coerce rejected asylum seekers to leave the country. Second, it argues that these mechanisms are linked to a history of ‘othering’ and policing of marginalised communities in Switzerland. Third, it contends that illegalised migrants resist and challenge politics of control by engaging in social, cultural and political activities thereby claiming the right to belong.
About the speaker
Claudia Wilopo is a PhD candidate at the Department of Cultural Anthropology and European Ethnology, University of Basel. She holds a Master in Urban Studies and is currently a visiting scholar with Laurier’s International Migration Research Centre (IMRC). Her research interests are migration, racial profiling, intersectionality, bordering and citizenship practices in Europe. Claudia holds a Swiss National Science Foundation scholarship and has recently co-authored a book on Racial Profiling in Switzerland published in German with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation.
Co-sponsored by the International Migration Research Centre.

Oct
16
Wed
2019
Monthly Meeting: Council of Canadians, Kitchener-Waterloo Chapter @ Community Room, Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes
Oct 16 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Kitchener-Waterloo chapter ofThe Council of Canadians - Acting for Social Justice | Le Conseil des Canadiens - Agir pour la Justice Sociale Council of Canadians meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in the Community Room at Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes, 307 Queen St S. (corner of Queen and Courtland), Kitchener.

There’s parking, but check with the organizers to get a permit.

Current topics include electoral reform, the Nestle boycott, and the
TPP and other trade deals.

All are welcome! For info please contact KW.cofc@gmail.com. Follow @kwcofc on Twitter.

Nov
16
Sat
2019
Agency Orientation
Nov 16 @ 9:30 am – 11:30 am
Nov
18
Mon
2019
Stride Circles Training
Nov 18 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Please note that in order to register for the Stride Circles training you must first have taken the Stride Night training and then volunteered within the Stride Night program for a minimum of 6 months.  

Nov
20
Wed
2019
Monthly Meeting: Council of Canadians, Kitchener-Waterloo Chapter @ Community Room, Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes
Nov 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Kitchener-Waterloo chapter ofThe Council of Canadians - Acting for Social Justice | Le Conseil des Canadiens - Agir pour la Justice Sociale Council of Canadians meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in the Community Room at Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes, 307 Queen St S. (corner of Queen and Courtland), Kitchener.

There’s parking, but check with the organizers to get a permit.

Current topics include electoral reform, the Nestle boycott, and the
TPP and other trade deals.

All are welcome! For info please contact KW.cofc@gmail.com. Follow @kwcofc on Twitter.

Dec
18
Wed
2019
Monthly Meeting: Council of Canadians, Kitchener-Waterloo Chapter @ Community Room, Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes
Dec 18 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Kitchener-Waterloo chapter ofThe Council of Canadians - Acting for Social Justice | Le Conseil des Canadiens - Agir pour la Justice Sociale Council of Canadians meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in the Community Room at Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes, 307 Queen St S. (corner of Queen and Courtland), Kitchener.

There’s parking, but check with the organizers to get a permit.

Current topics include electoral reform, the Nestle boycott, and the
TPP and other trade deals.

All are welcome! For info please contact KW.cofc@gmail.com. Follow @kwcofc on Twitter.

Jan
15
Wed
2020
Monthly Meeting: Council of Canadians, Kitchener-Waterloo Chapter @ Community Room, Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes
Jan 15 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Kitchener-Waterloo chapter ofThe Council of Canadians - Acting for Social Justice | Le Conseil des Canadiens - Agir pour la Justice Sociale Council of Canadians meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in the Community Room at Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes, 307 Queen St S. (corner of Queen and Courtland), Kitchener.

There’s parking, but check with the organizers to get a permit.

Current topics include electoral reform, the Nestle boycott, and the
TPP and other trade deals.

All are welcome! For info please contact KW.cofc@gmail.com. Follow @kwcofc on Twitter.

Jan
17
Fri
2020
Transformative Mediation Training
Jan 17 @ 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Feb
20
Thu
2020
UN World Day of Social Justice
Feb 20 all-day

Each year, 20 February is the United Nations FlagUnited Nations World Day for Social Justice.

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For the United Nations, the pursuit of social justice for all is at the core of our global mission to promote development and human dignity. The adoption by the International Labour Organization of the Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization is just one recent example of the UN system’s commitment to social justice. The Declaration focuses on guaranteeing fair outcomes for all through employment, social protection, social dialogue, and fundamental principles and rights at work.

The General Assembly proclaimed 20 February as World Day of Social Justice in 2007, inviting Member States to devote the day to promoting national activities in accordance with the objectives and goals of the World Summit for Social Development and the twenty-fourth session of the General Assembly. Observance of World Day of Social Justice should support efforts of the international community in poverty eradication, the promotion of full employment and decent work, gender equity and access to social well-being and justice for all.

Apr
28
Tue
2020
Transformative Mediation Training April 28 – May 1, 2020
Apr 28 @ 8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Sep
18
Fri
2020
Transformative Mediation Training Sept. 17, 18 & 24, 25, 2020
Sep 18 @ 8:30 am – 4:30 pm