Events

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Sep
25
Tue
2018
Policy Analyst Recruitment and Development Program, Natural Resources Canada
Sep 25 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Natural Resources Canada has for the last few years organized a comprehensive, department-specific program to recruit policy analysts and economists. Through our Policy Analyst Recruitment and Development Program (PARDP), we are creating opportunities for creative, passionate and talented Canadians to make a contribution to the sustainable stewardship of natural resources at home and overseas.
As always, we are hoping to recruit a pool of highly motivated, energetic and analytically minded people at the Master’s or PhD level for our 2017-2018 campaign. Fields of study include: Economics, Statistics, Sociology, Agricultural Economics, Forest Economics, Resource Economics, Public Administration, Resource Management, Environmental Studies, or other related disciplines.
This information session will provide you with a quick overview of the program and the opportunities it presents for soon-to-be graduates like yourself. It is also an opportunity to ask any questions you might have to people that have successfully navigated the application process.
The link for this year’s competition can be found here: https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/careers/85
The deadline for applications is October 8, 2018.

Sep
26
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Sep 26 all-day
What’s Next for NAFTA… and North America? A Panel Discussion
Sep 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

The renegotiation of NAFTA has roared back into the headlines since late August. At this panel discussion, experts from CIGI, Wilfrid Laurier University and the University of Waterloo will shed light on the talks and their implications for Canada, North America, and the world.
A light lunch will be served.
About the panelists
Hugo Perezcano Díaz is the deputy director of International Economic Law with the International Law Research Program (ILRP) and was previously a CIGI senior fellow with the ILRP. Prior to joining CIGI, he was an attorney and international trade consultant in private practice. Hugo worked for the Mexican government’s Ministry of Economy for nearly 20 years, serving as head of the trade remedy authority, and formerly as general counsel for international trade negotiations. Hugo was lead counsel for Mexico in investor-state dispute settlement cases under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and other international investment agreements.
Patricia Goff is Associate Professor and Chair of political science at Wilfrid Laurier University and Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), both in Waterloo, Ontario. She specializes in international political economy, international relations theory, and international organizations, with a particular interest in trade and the cultural capacity of international organizations. She is the author of Limits to Liberalization: Local Culture in a Global Market Place (Cornell University Press) and co-editor of Identity and Global Politics: Empirical and Theoretical Elaborations (with Kevin Dunn) and Irrelevant or Indispensable: The UN in the 21st Century (with Paul Heinbecker).
John Ravenhill is Director of the Balsillie School of International Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo. His work has appeared in most of the leading journals of international relations including International Organization, World Politics, Review of International Political Economy and Review of International Studies. His most recent books are The Oxford Handbook of the International Relations of Asia (co-edited with Saadia Pekkanen and Rosemary Foot) and the fifth edition of Global Political Economy (both from Oxford University Press). In 2016, he received the International Studies Association’s International Political Economy Section’s Distinguished Scholar award.
Debora L. VanNijnatten is Professor, Political Science and North American Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University, Associate Faculty with the Balsillie School of International Affairs, and Research Partner with the Great Lakes Policy Research Network  Her research and publications have focused on transboundary environmental governance in North America, Canada-U.S. environmental relations and Canada’s international environmental policy.

Sep
27
Thu
2018
Re-Imagining Borders Technologies; Designing New Political Forms
Sep 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

This paper will explore the nature of an alter-politics emerging around borders and border walls. Much of the debate on borders – both academically and politically – has revolved around a dichotomy: whether they should be open, or closed. The open borders argument is about free and unfettered movement for all; and the closed borders argument suggests people should be able to create and maintain an inside and an outside. I will argue for an emerging speculative politics that imagines borders beyond this dichotomy, using different terms — such permeable, temporary, multi-layered; and different forms – such as welcome lounges, or flyways. I trace various political movements that are re-articulating the meaning of borders in theory and in practice, including the new sanctuary movement, while pushing anthropological methods into the speculative: how might we imagine, design and amplify some of these possible alternate political forms?
About the speaker
Miriam Ticktin is Associate Professor of Anthropology at The New School for Social Research. Her research has focused in the broadest sense on what it means to make political claims in the name of a universal humanity. She is the author of Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France (University of California Press, 2011) and In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care (co-edited with Ilana Feldman, Duke University Press, 2010), along with many other articles and book chapters. She is a founding editor of the journal Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development. Ticktin is currently at work on two related book projects: 1) a short book on innocence as a political concept, and how it produces an unending search for purity; 2) a book on practices of containment at the border, from border walls to spaces of quarantine.

Sep
28
Fri
2018
Transformative Mediation Training September 21, 22 & 28, 29, 2018
Sep 28 @ 8:30 am – Sep 29 @ 4:30 pm
Scholarship Proposal Writing
Sep 28 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

This session will focus on the tools students need to approach scholarship proposal writing with confidence. Working from samples of winning OGS, SSHRC, and NSERC proposals written by graduate students, it will examine common features of successful proposals, and will teach students to apply these writing strategies to their own proposals.
This workshop is being led by the Laurier Writing Centre.
Students from both Laurier and UW are welcome to attend.

Sep
29
Sat
2018
Ride For Refuge @ Koinonia Christian Fellowship
Sep 29 all-day

Cyclists

We believe that riding our bikes [or walking], can change the world.

The Ride for Refuge is a family-friendly cycling and walking fundraising event that helps you support charities who provide refuge and hope for some of the most vulnerable people on earth.

Your participation in the RIDE is a way to stand up for those whose lives are deeply and often permanently affected by forces and events they can’t control, or who are exploited by the greedy and powerful who care nothing for human suffering.

The 2018 Ride for Refuge will be held on Saturday, September 29, 2018 and provides each participant the chance to:

  • Ride up to 50km
  • Walk, or stroll 5km
  • Fundraise for a participating RIDE charity partner

Remember – you need to be on a team riding for the charity you love for your fundraising to flow to them! Team Captains are responsible for selecting the charity when they start their team.

Registration Details

  • Kids 10 and under: Absolutely free to participate (but you’ll have to fundraise $75 to earn your t-shirt).
  • Youth 11-17: Fundraise $75 or more to earn your t-shirt and avoid paying the registration fee of $25.
  • Adults 18 and over: Fundraise $150 or more to earn your t-shirt and avoid paying the registration fee of $25.
  • Note: The registration fee will increase to $40 on Monday, September 24th.

Routes & Distances

  • Cycling Routes – cyclists can select 10km, 25km or 50km distances when registering. Many locations may require you to loop the 25km route twice to complete your 50km. NOTE: not all routes are exact distances. Local requirements may result in shorter distances based on available routes and permits.

  • Walking Routes – we also offer a 5km walking route at each RIDE site. About 25% of our participants select this option.

  • Fun and Safety – our locations work hard to offer child-friendly routes that are well-staffed with friendly volunteers. Along the route, riders and walkers enjoy rest stops and support vehicles. After the event, lunch is served for all volunteers and participants.

Oct
2
Tue
2018
Group 9, Amnesty International regular meeting @ Community Ed Room 2202, Conrad Grebel College
Oct 2 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Amnesty International CanadaGroup Nine is the local chapter of Amnesty International Canada in the Kitchener-Waterloo area. We normally meet at 7:30 pm on the first Tuesday of every month in Room 4224 (The Fretz Seminar Room) at Conrad Grebel College, University of Waterloo (140 Westmount Road North, Waterloo N2L 3G6). Please confirm by email or on our Facebook page.

<groupnine9@gmail.com> is the official Group Nine e-mail address.

Oct
3
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Oct 3 all-day
Stride Night Training
Oct 3 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Oct
4
Thu
2018
Visible Yet Invisible: The Disciplinary Mechanism of Self-surveillance Among Undocumented South Asian Men in Rural Greece
Oct 4 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Photo credit: Reena Kukreja
“We go to the farm, work, and then come back to spend the rest of the time in the ‘dera’ (residence). We do not go anywhere else. This is the story of my life here for 12 years.”
“I feel like I am living in a prison without walls. I dare not step out of the dera for fear of police arresting me.”
– Undocumented South Asian male migrants
During the day, large groups of undocumented male migrants from India and Pakistan are visible as agricultural workers in the farmlands of rural Megara and Thiva regions of Greece. Come evening, their labouring bodies become totally invisible from the rural landscape. In this talk, Reena Kukregja relates the Foucauldian biopolitics of power and the disciplinary mechanism of self-surveillance to the contradictory  (non)presence of racialized labouring bodies of South Asian men in rural Greece. She draws upon interviews of South Asian male migrants there to reveal the processes through which the disciplinary mechanism of the state, exercised through the threat of arrests and deportations, works efficiently to make them conform to a certain set of societal behaviours, erase their presence from Greek public spaces, and extract productive labour efficiently from them. The invisible coercive power of the state’s gaze makes the men self-surveil and regulate their movements by ‘containing’ themselves in the residences after work. It also does away with the need for overt displays of punishment and disciplining. Further, the sequestering of the men in isolated physical spaces of residences or deras that are located in the farms of local Greek farmers reinforces their “othering,” and prevents local Greeks from building solidarity with them.
About the speaker
Reena Kukreja, an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Development Studies and Cultural Studies, Queen’s University, divides time between teaching, research, and filmmaking. She has directed several award-winning documentaries on rural women in India and South Asia. Her current research focuses on two strands of South Asian masculinities: the first examines the intersections of xenophobia, Islamophobia, securitization of citizenship, and border controls on undocumented South Asian male migrants in Greece; and the other examines the role of religion, caste, and political economy in shaping relational male identities and masculinity among lower classes of rural Indian men in contemporary North India. She has published in Modern Asian Studies and the Journal of Intercultural Studies. She is currently completing her book manuscript, Partial Truths, Negotiated Existences: Examining Dispossession of Matrimonial Choice in Cross-Region Marriages in India (Cornell University Press).

Oct
9
Tue
2018
New Thinking for Post-Oslo Palestine Challenges & Opportunities @ Avon Mennonite Church
Oct 9 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Jonathan Kuttab A Palestinian International Human Rights Lawyer’s Perspective.

Christian communities will be especially interested in learning about this:

Watershed Moment: A Christian Palestinian Human Rights Perspective on Challenges and Opportunities

Admission by donation. Proceeds will benefit Just Peace Advocates.

Hear what is happening currently on the ground in Palestine from respected international human rights lawyer, Jonathan Kuttab.

Palestine is at a watershed moment. The Deal of the Century, the move of the US Embassy to Jerusalem and the ending of UNRWA funding by the Trump Administration, are a few of the currents issues that speak of a final solution to the Palestinian problem.

25 years post-Oslo, a two state solution is no longer feasible. This being the case what is the solution to the Palestinian problem.

Suggested donation $10 or pay what you can.

Venue – Avon Mennonite Church, Multipurpose Room, 90 Greenwood

Local contact – Carol Rock, c-rock@rogers.com; cell 226-921-9030

Accessibility- Accessible, scent free

Co- sponsors: Avon Mennonite www.avonmennonite.com, Others to be confirmed.

————————————-
Jonathan Kuttab:

Jonathan Kuttab is a leading human rights lawyer. After a graduating with his Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD) from Virgina Law School, and practicing a couple years on Wall Street, Jonathan returned home to Palestine.

In 1979, Jonathan cofounded Al Haq, the first international human rights legal organization in Palestine. Later he co-founded the Palestinian Center for the Study of Non-Violence (now Violence International) and also founded the Mandela Institute for Prisoners.

Jonathan is a Palestinian Christian, who is past chair of the Bethlehem Bible College serves on the board of the Sabeel Ecumenical Theology Center in Jerusalem and is a leader in the establishment of Christ at the Checkpoint conference. Jonathan was part of the 1994 legal team for the Cairo agreement that resulted in the Oslo II Accord.

Jonathan was visiting scholar at Osgoode Law School at York University in Toronto in the Fall of 2017, and is a founding director of Just Peace Advocates?Mouvement pour une Paix Juste, a Canadian based international law human rights not-for-profit.

Jonathan is a resident of East Jerusalem, and is a partner of Kuttab, Khoury and Hanna Law Firm in East Jerusalem.

—————-

Campaigns in partnership with Just Peace Advocates that Jonathan will also be sharing:

Jonathan will speak of the situation for Palestinians living in Gaza, and highlight the Al Haq Gaza 20/20: Perceptions and Reality campaign.

He will also speak about the demographic plan to remove Palestine from Jerusalem, and will highlight the Civic Coalition for Palestinian Rights in Jerusalem campaign “The Reality for Jerusalem After Trump.”
—————————————————–

Al Haq is an independent Palestinian non-governmental human rights organisation based in Ramallah, West Bank. Established in 1979 to protect and promote human rights and the rule of law in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT), the organisation has special consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. See alhaq.org

The Civic Coalition for Palestinian Rights in Jerusalem includes a number of human rights groups who come together to focus on the rights of Palestinians in Jerusalem.

http://www.civiccoalition-jerusalem.org/about.html

—————————————————–

Just Peace Advocates focuses on public policy interests for equity for all people including those of Palestine is advanced through strong national and international networks that build effective relationships with government, media, Canadian civil society, including all faiths and ethnic groups, and supporters of human rights and international law. Learn about Just Peace Advocates at justpeaceadvocates.ca New Thinking for Post-Oslo Palestine Challenges & Opportunities | Facebook

Oct
10
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Oct 10 all-day
Oct
12
Fri
2018
NCYC Training
Oct 12 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Oct
17
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Oct 17 all-day
Monthly Meeting: Council of Canadians, Kitchener-Waterloo Chapter @ Community Room, Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes
Oct 17 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Kitchener-Waterloo chapter ofThe Council of Canadians - Acting for Social Justice | Le Conseil des Canadiens - Agir pour la Justice Sociale Council of Canadians meets on the third Wednesday of every month from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in the Community Room at Bread and Roses Co-operative Homes, 307 Queen St S. (corner of Queen and Courtland), Kitchener.

There’s parking, but check with the organizers to get a permit.

Current topics include electoral reform, the Nestle boycott, and the
TPP and other trade deals.

All are welcome! For info please contact KW.cofc@gmail.com. Follow @kwcofc on Twitter.

Oct
22
Mon
2018
Policy Analyst Recruitment and Development Program, Department of Canadian Heritage
Oct 22 @ 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

Phillippe Roseberry, Senior Policy and Research Analyst in the Broadcasting and Digital Communications Branch of the Department of Canadian Heritage, will introduce graduate students to the opportunities available in the Federal Government through the Recruitment of Policy Leaders program.
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Oct
23
Tue
2018
Levers for Food Systems Change: A Panel Discussion on Urban Food Security, Food Justice, and International Agreements
Oct 23 @ 8:15 am – 10:30 am

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Over the last three years various international agreements have highlighted the need for greater coordination along the food chain and increased food justice in creating urban food security. These international agreements have set the stage for new urban food policy to emerge. At this panel discussion, food system experts from Wilfrid Laurier University, Carleton University, and the City of Toronto will explore how we can use the New Urban Agenda and other international agreements (SDGs and the Milan Urban Food Policy Pact) as levers for changing the food system.
A light breakfast will be served.
Registration is required.
Panel moderated by:
Dr. Alison Blay-Palmer, Director of the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems and Associate Professor in Geography and Environmental Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University
With panelists:
Dr. Patricia Ballamingie, Associate Professor in Environmental Studies and Human Geography at Carleton University
Barbara Emanuel, Manager Toronto Food Strategy, Toronto Public Health
Dr. Theresa Schumilas, Postdoctoral Fellow in Geography and Environmental Science at Wilfrid Laurier University

Oct
24
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Oct 24 all-day
Oct
25
Thu
2018
Canada’s Natural Resources: Let’s Not Abandon Our Strengths
Oct 25 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

It has become difficult to initiate natural resource extraction projects in Canada. Construction-aggregate mining in southern Ontario has been subject to unpredictable and cost-prohibitive regulation, as are major pipelines in western Canada. Natural gas development is prohibited in eastern Canada because of fear of fracking; fracked gas is thus imported from Pennsylvania. The cost to our economy is significant in terms of foregone tax revenue and lost opportunities for rural Canadians, who might not aspire to urban life, and for the country’s professional engineering and geoscientific communities, which are “high tech” players internationally.
About the speakers
Maurice Dusseault is a Professor, Engineering Geology at the University of Waterloo and a registered professional engineer in Alberta and Ontario. He frequently works with governments and industry as an advisor and instructor. He carries out research in petroleum geomechanics (drilling, hydraulic fracturing, reservoir geomechanics), and is a world expert on new production methods, deep waste sequestration in sedimentary basins, and reservoir geomechanics.
Richard Jackson is a Fellow at Geofirma Engineering and Adjunct Professor, Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Waterloo.

Oct
26
Fri
2018
China in Africa: A Model for Africans or a New Colonialism?
Oct 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

There have been contacts between China and African states that extended over centuries. During the Cold War, China played a role supporting anti-colonial/anti-apartheid struggles across the continent. Since 1978, China has undergone a rapid process of modernization that catapulted the country into a leading role in international trade, investment, political influence, and even as a growing military power.
Nelson Mandela’s role in South African relations is of special interest, and his views on the People’s Republic of China are noteworthy.
As China’s role in the international system expands, Beijing’s relations with countries of the African continent continue to deepen. Against the context, a distinct but important question is whether or not the Chinese model of development can or even should be applied to African circumstances?
African views, both of governments and peoples vary widely, from a welcome embrace of an alternative to Western powers, particularly former colonial powers, to a resentment of Chinese trade dominance and investment policies.
The variance in views, raises yet another question: whether Sino-African relationship is one of equality or one that is manifested in what some have described as ‘neo-colonial’ policies that seek to extend and cement Chinese dominance of the region? Answers to this question will vary depending within the range of African countries, as well as polling undertaken on this point.
What is clear, however, the profile of China within Africa continues to rise, and there is reason to believe that China will maintain a high-profile, and even an expanded role on the African continent in the 21st century.
About the speaker
Professor Houlden is the Director of the China Institute, Professor of Political Science and Adjunct Professor of the Alberta School of Business at the University of Alberta. He has also served as a Governor of the International Development Research Centre’s (IDRC) Board of Governors and was a Member of the Government of Alberta’s Asia Advisory Council. He was born in Calgary, Alberta, and attended the University of Calgary where he received his B.A., and subsequently did graduate work at Carleton University in Ottawa, and at the University Nacional in Lima, Peru.
Professor Houlden joined the Canadian Foreign Service in 1976, and has served in the East Asian, China, Caribbean, Latin American and Defence Relations, and as Director of the Eastern and Southern African Divisions of the then Department of Foreign Affairs . Abroad he has been posted to Havana, Hong Kong (twice), Warsaw, Beijing (twice – most recently as Minister 2001-2004), and as Executive Director of the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei (2004-2006). While a Foreign Service officer, Prof. Houlden studied at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (1981-1983), and at the National Defence College in Kingston (1992-1993). Twenty-two of his years in the Canadian foreign service were spent working on Chinese affairs for the Government of Canada. His last assignment before joining the University of Alberta in 2008 was as Director General of the East Asian Bureau of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.
Under Professor Houlden’s leadership, the China Institute has focused on contemporary China studies, with an emphasis on Canada’s trade, investment and energy linkages with the People’s Republic of China.
Professor Houlden has written two co-edited volumes on the South China Sea, published in 2012 and 2018. The Director is a frequent media commentator on Asian affairs, with Canadian, Chinese and other international news organizations.

Oct
29
Mon
2018
Where They Matter – Human Rights at the Local Level: Opportunities and Challenges
Oct 29 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Within the process of urbanization, cities are becoming ever more important venues for human rights promotion and protection. Local authorities have begun to accept human rights obligations in delivering socio-economic services, managing space, providing security and enabling participation in politics and culture. In doing so, they effectively implement international human rights law in a practical way and close to the citizens, complementary (and sometimes contrary to) the respective central government. International legal and policy frameworks indicate that human rights at the local level will be one of the key themes for the coming years. This development begs questions as to the status of cities and local authorities as human rights actors, individually (e.g. as human rights cities) or in international human rights coalitions.
About the speaker
Gerd Oberleitner is Professor of international law and UNESCO Chair in Human Rights and Human Security at the Faculty of Law, University of Graz, Austria. He is also the Head of the Institute of International Law and International Relations of the University of Graz and the Director of the European Training and Research Centre for Human Rights and Democracy at the University of Graz. He served as Legal Adviser in the Human Rights Department of the Austrian Foreign Ministry and was Lecturer in Human Rights at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Visiting Fellow at the LSE’s Centre for the Study of Human Rights, Visiting Scholar at the European Inter-University Centre Venice and the Université du Quebéc à Montréal and Visiting Professor at the Universities of Ljubljana and Rutgers University. He teaches in the European Regional Master Programme in Democracy and Human Rights in South-East Europe (Sarajevo), the European Master’s Programme in Human Rights and Democratisation (Venice) and the Master Programme of Human Rights and Democratisation for Latin America and the Caribbean (Buenos Aires). Publications include Global Human Rights Institutions: between Remedy and Ritual (Polity 2007), Human Rights in Armed Conflict: Law, Practice, Policy (Cambridge University Press 2015), (as co-editor) Blurring Boundaries: Human Security and Forced Migration (Brill 2017) and (as editor) Human Rights Institutions, Tribunals and Courts (Springer 2018).

Oct
31
Wed
2018
Refugee Vision Care
Oct 31 all-day
Nov
3
Sat
2018
Stride Circles Training
Nov 3 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Nov
6
Tue
2018
Group 9, Amnesty International regular meeting @ Community Ed Room 2202, Conrad Grebel College
Nov 6 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Amnesty International CanadaGroup Nine is the local chapter of Amnesty International Canada in the Kitchener-Waterloo area. We normally meet at 7:30 pm on the first Tuesday of every month in Room 4224 (The Fretz Seminar Room) at Conrad Grebel College, University of Waterloo (140 Westmount Road North, Waterloo N2L 3G6). Please confirm by email or on our Facebook page.

<groupnine9@gmail.com> is the official Group Nine e-mail address.