Events

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Nov
21
Wed
2018
Information Session: The Department of National Defence’s Policy Officer Recruitment Programme
Nov 21 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

The Policy Group at the Department of National Defence (DND) is currently conducting its 2018-2019 recruitment campaign for the Policy Officer Recruitment Programme (PORP), a three-year programme designed to recruit and develop talented individuals to meet the unique demands of the defence policy environment and become well-rounded Public Servants. Candidates selected for a PORP position are offered an indeterminate position with the Government of Canada at DND.
This presentation will offer interested students insights into the fascinating and multi-faceted work of the Policy Group in a busy department of the Government of Canada. The presentation will also allow potential candidates to understand the importance of clear applications, covering letters and resumes, and explain the challenges associated with interviews for a position with the Government of Canada.
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About the speaker
Anthony Ippolito is a Senior Policy Officer in the Department of National Defence’s Policy Group. During his time in the Policy Group to date he has served in several positions, including, among others, as a speechwriter to the Minister of National Defence and the Chief of the Defence Staff, as the officer responsible for Canada’s defence relations with NATO and several European nations, and as an officer on the team that manages DND’s relationship with the Parliament of Canada. He also deployed for seven months to the Middle East as the policy advisor on Operation IMPACT, Canada’s military contribution to the Global Coalition Against Daesh.
 

Public Forum — Adapting to Climate Change in Waterloo Region @ Balsillie School of International Affairs
Nov 21 @ 5:45 pm – 8:00 pm

Waterloo Jazz Festival tents blow away in the windstorm
The Region of Waterloo is consulting with a wide variety of local organizations and residents to develop a Community-wide Climate Adaptation Plan. This plan aims to help reduce the potential impacts of extreme weather and climate change to the community. Impacts could affect human health and safety, cause damages to properties and infrastructure, and negatively affect the natural environment.

By participating in this Public Forum, you will have an opportunity to:

Discover how climate change may affect Waterloo Region, and how these impacts can be addressed through the Region’s Community-wide Climate Adaptation Plan

Help shape the Plan by participating in an interactive activity, where you will have an opportunity to provide input and ideas on potential actions that the community can take to better prepare for climate change and extreme weather.

A light meal and refreshments will be served.

PRELIMINARY AGENDA

5:45 – 6:00 – Doors open, food and beverages available

6:00 – 6:30 – Introductory presentation, including an overview of the Community Climate Adaptation Plan and priority risks for Waterloo Region

6:30 – 8:00 – Interactive brainstorming activity

ADDITIONAL VENUE INFORMATION
view MAP

The event will be held in Room 1-42 at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, located in the CIGI Campus at 67 Erb Street West, Waterloo . Parking in the CIGI parking lot behind the building will be free for attendees of this event.

Space is limited, so please register if you would like to attend.
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/public-forum-adapting-to-climate-change-in-waterloo-region-tickets-51476361182

Nov
22
Thu
2018
Justice and Reconciliation in World Politics
Nov 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Justice and Reconciliation in World Politics is a study in normative and critical theory of how to conceptualize practices of justice and reconciliation that aim to respond to colonial injustices in international and transnational contexts. Examining cases of colonial war, genocide, forced sexual labour, forcible incorporation, and dispossession, this book highlights the structural injustices involved in colonialism, based on race, class, and gender, and shows that interactional practices of justice and reconciliation have been inadequate in redressing these structural injustices. The book argues that contemporary moral/political projects of justice and reconciliation in response to the persistent structural injustices of a colonial international order entail strategies of decolonization, decentering, and disalienation that go beyond interactional practices of accountability and reparation, beyond victims and perpetrators, and beyond a statist world order.
About the speaker
Catherine Lu is Associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University, and Coordinator of the Research Group on Global Justice of the Yan P. Lin Centre. Her research and teaching interests intersect political theory and international relations, focusing on critical and normative studies of humanitarianism and intervention in world politics; theories and practices of justice and reconciliation; colonialism and structural injustice; and cosmopolitanism, global justice, and the world state. She is the author of Justice and Reconciliation in World Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2017), and Just and Unjust Interventions in World Politics: Public and Private (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).

Japan as a ‘Normal Country’? Retrospect and Prospect
Nov 22 @ 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm

This event is open to the Balsillie School and CIGI community only. To register for the public event, visit “Japan’s Future Global Role: A New Dawn for the Land of the Rising Sun?“.
There is an ongoing debate about whether Japan is – and if not, whether it can or should become – a “normal country.” For decades the received wisdom has been that Japan – at least in its international presence – lacked something vitally necessary for it to be taken seriously and treated with the respect befitting a country of its size and sophistication. Is Japan a “normal” country? If not, in what sense is it not, and what are the prospects for Japan’s “normalization”?
Agenda
14:00 – 14:15 Welcoming remarks by Dr. John Ravnehill, Director, BSIA and Ms. Takako Ito, Consul-General of Japan in Toronto
14:15 – 15:15 Presentations by Dr. Yoshihide Soeya and Dr. Masayuki Tadokoro, Keio University, and Dr. David Welch, BSIA, CIGI and Japan Futures Initiative
15:15 – 16:15 Q&A
16:15 – 16:30 Closing remarks by Dr. Rohinton Medhora, President, CIGI and Ms. Takako Ito, Consul-General of Japan in Toronto
This event is presented as a partnership between the Balsillie School of International Affairs, the Centre for International Governance Innovation and the Japan Futures Initiative.
About the speakers
Yoshihide Soeya is Professor of political science and international relations at the Faculty of Law of Keio University. His areas of interest are politics and security in East Asia, and Japanese diplomacy and its external relations. He received Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1987, majoring in world politics. He served as the Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies of the same university for six years until September 2013, and as the Director of its Center for Contemporary Korean Studies for five years until March 2016. Recently, Dr. Soeya was a Japan Scholar of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. from September 2013 to January 2014, and a Korea Foundation Fellow affiliated with the ASAN Institute in Seoul in March-May 2014. His most recent publications in English include “The Rise of China in Asia: Japan at the Nexus,” in Asle Toje, ed., Will China’s Rise be Peaceful? Security, Stability, and Legitimacy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), and “The Case for an Alternative Strategy for Japan: Beyond the Article 9-Alliance Regime,” in Michael J. Green and Zack Cooper, eds., Postwar Japan: Growth, Security and Uncertainty since 1945 (Washington D.C.: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2017).
Masayuki Tadokoro is Professor of International Relations at Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. Born in Osaka, he attended Kyoto University and the London School of Economics. Previously he was a professor at the National Defense Academy. In 1988-89, he stayed in Washington D.C. a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, and in 1991 he taught for a semester as Fulbright Scholar in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh. His primary field is international political economy, but he works also on Japanese foreign and security policy. His publications in English include, “After the Dollar?”, International Relations of the Asia Pacific 10:3 (2010); and “Why did Japan fail to become the ‘Britain’ of Asia”, in David Wolff et al., eds., The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective (Brill, 2007). He also edited with David Welch and Yoshihide Soeya, Japan as a ‘Normal Country’?: A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World, (Toronto U.P. 2011).
David Welch is a CIGI senior fellow and professor of political science at the University of Waterloo located at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. An award-winning author and scholar, David is an expert in foreign policy decision making and international security, with an emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region.

Japan’s Future Global Role: A New Dawn for the Land of the Rising Sun?
Nov 22 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

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The world is entering a period of great geopolitical uncertainty and potential instability. Under Donald Trump, the United States is systematically undermining the pillars of the international order that it largely built and on which its global influence depends. Cracks are beginning to show in the foundations of China’s rise. Brexit is threatening to diminish both Britain and the European Union. Russia continues to try to undermine Western liberal democracy and destabilize its hinterland. Amidst these worrying trends and developments, Japan stands as a beacon of prosperity and stability. Can it assume a global role commensurate with its wealth and power? What would a Japan-led international order look like? This event is presented as a partnership between the Balsillie School of International Affairs, the Centre for International Governance Innovation and the Japan Futures Initiative.
About the speakers
Yoshihide Soeya is Professor of political science and international relations at the Faculty of Law of Keio University. His areas of interest are politics and security in East Asia, and Japanese diplomacy and its external relations. He received Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1987, majoring in world politics. He served as the Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies of the same university for six years until September 2013, and as the Director of its Center for Contemporary Korean Studies for five years until March 2016. Recently, Dr. Soeya was a Japan Scholar of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. from September 2013 to January 2014, and a Korea Foundation Fellow affiliated with the ASAN Institute in Seoul in March-May 2014. His most recent publications in English include “The Rise of China in Asia: Japan at the Nexus,” in Asle Toje, ed., Will China’s Rise be Peaceful? Security, Stability, and Legitimacy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), and “The Case for an Alternative Strategy for Japan: Beyond the Article 9-Alliance Regime,” in Michael J. Green and Zack Cooper, eds., Postwar Japan: Growth, Security and Uncertainty since 1945 (Washington D.C.: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2017).
Masayuki Tadokoro is Professor of International Relations at Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. Born in Osaka, he attended Kyoto University and the London School of Economics. Previously he was a professor at the National Defense Academy. In 1988-89, he stayed in Washington D.C. a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, and in 1991 he taught for a semester as Fulbright Scholar in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh. His primary field is international political economy, but he works also on Japanese foreign and security policy. His publications in English include, “After the Dollar?”, International Relations of the Asia Pacific 10:3 (2010); and “Why did Japan fail to become the ‘Britain’ of Asia”, in David Wolff et al., eds., The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective (Brill, 2007). He also edited with David Welch and Yoshihide Soeya, Japan as a ‘Normal Country’?: A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World, (Toronto U.P. 2011).
David Welch is a CIGI senior fellow and professor of political science at the University of Waterloo located at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. An award-winning author and scholar, David is an expert in foreign policy decision making and international security, with an emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region.

Nov
23
Fri
2018
Resumé and Cover Letter Writing
Nov 23 @ 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

MA Global Governance students are invited to participate in this professional development session led by the Centre for Career Action at the University of Waterloo.

Dec
5
Wed
2018
PhD Dissertation Defence: Dealer Bank Influence and the International Political Economy of Over-the-Counter Derivatives Regulation
Dec 5 @ 9:30 am – 1:00 pm

Irene Spagna’s PhD Dissertation Defence, “Dealer Bank Influence and the International Political Economy of Over-the-Counter Derivatives Regulation – The Introduction of Mandatory Margin Requirements for Non-Centrally Cleared Derivatives after the Global Financial Crisis of 2008”
Advisor: Eric Helleiner
Committee: Derek Hall, Bessma Momani
Internal/external examiner: Olaf Weber, University of Waterloo
External examiner: Eleni Tsingou, Copenhagen School of Business
Abstract:
Prior to the global financial crisis of 2008, large dealer banks exercised strong influence over the regulation of OTC (over-the-counter) derivatives in the United States and the European Union. Has there been any change in their influence over policy outcomes in the regulation of OTC derivatives in these two jurisdictions since the global financial crisis of 2008? If so, why? If not, why not? This thesis addresses these questions by analyzing the post-crisis introduction of mandatory margin requirements for non-centrally cleared derivatives.
It argues that this regulatory innovation reveals a significant decrease in dealer bank influence. Shifting from a position of dominance before the crisis, the dealer banks’ influence over this regulatory reform process was significantly reduced. To explain this change, the thesis argues that the influence of dealer bank preferences over regulatory outcomes in this sector is moderated by a number of variables. Based on a survey of literature in international political economy (IPE), it identifies six moderators whose effect individually and jointly shapes the degree of bank influence over policy outcomes: business unity, public issue salience, policy-makers’ ideational outlook, the state of the transnational policy community, inter-state power relations, and the domestic institutional environment. Prior to the crisis, all six moderators individually and jointly operated to the banks’ advantage. The crisis, however, caused an exogenous shock to the system, resulting in a fundamental reconfiguration, and corresponding reduction in influence.
Theoretically, this dissertation speaks to the literature analyzing private financial sector influence over financial regulation. Specifically, it contributes to the literature that conceives of ‘influence over policy outcomes’ as a moderated condition by exploring the role of the six variables in moderating the influence of dealer bank preferences over regulatory outcomes in this sector. Empirically, it provides the first detailed analysis of some important elements of the margin reform, which, despite the enormous significance of derivatives to the global economy, has received little scholarly attention. The margin reform represents a sea change in terms of the governance of the uncleared market, but it has not been accompanied with broader change reaching beyond the effort of addressing ‘systemic risk’.