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Feb
25
Mon
2019
Food Security in Africa’s Secondary Cities: Dschang, Cameroon
Feb 25 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

The problem of urban food security has received little research or policy attention in Cameroon even though it is a rapidly urbanizing country and many people in cities are struggling to make ends meet. Some key problems are that there is high unemployment, food prices are high relative to incomes, and with population growth it is becoming increasingly difficult to survive by producing one’s own food. This presentation will review findings from a household survey that was carried out in Dschang, Cameroon to assess the levels of household food insecurity in that city and to understand how the food system functions. The majority of households were found to be food insecure and fully two thirds of households were severely food insecure, meaning that they frequently worried about food and that experiences such as going without food for an entire day were commonplace. Drawing on supplemental conservation research, the presentation will draw particular attention to the role of indigenous plants in Dschang’s food system. Most households consumed indigenous foods, which they usually had access to in city markets or street vendors or their own plantation.
About the speaker
Yanick Borel Kamga is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Plant Biology at University of Dschang, Cameroon. He completed an MSc. in Systematics and Plant Ecology at the University of Dschang, Cameroon and the Erasmus Mundus Masters degree in Tropical Biodiversity and Ecosystems (TROPIMUNDO) offered by the University of Brussels, Universidad Cientifica del Peru and Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in 2015. Yanick’s research interests include climate change, biodiversity, food security and sustainable development. He has conducted and participated in research on the impact of climate change on wildlife conservation in Peru; compilation of an inventory of flora species, wildlife and impact on indigenous population in Peru; inventory and characterization of vegetation of Mount Cameroon; and plant community ecology in West Highlands of Cameroon.
During his scholarship period at the Balsillie School of International Affairs as a Queen Elizabeth Advanced Scholar with the Hungry Cities Partnership, he focuses on food security in Dschang, Cameroon as part of a broader research project on changing food systems in Africa’s secondary cities.

Feb
27
Wed
2019
Canada, Oil and World Politics: The Real Story of Today’s Conflict Zones – Iraq, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Ukraine and More
Feb 27 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Petroleum is the most valuable commodity in the world and an enormous source of wealth for those who sell it, transport it and transform it for its many uses. As the engine of modern economies and industries, governments everywhere want to assure steady supplies. Without it, their economies would grind to a standstill.
Since petroleum is not evenly distributed around the world, powerful countries want to be sure they have access to supplies and markets, whatever the cost to the environment or to human life. Coveting the petroleum of another country is against the rules of international law — yet if accomplished surreptitiously, under the cover of some laudable action, it’s a bonanza. This is the basis of “the petroleum game,” where countries jockey for control of the world’s oil and natural gas. It’s an ongoing game of rivalry among global and regional countries, each pursuing its own interests and using whatever tools, allies and organizations offer possible advantage.
This talk, based on the book Oil and World Politics: The real story of today’s conflict zones – Iraq, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Ukraine and more, covers oil-producing countries, transit countries, the Big Powers as well as Canada. John Foster explores military interventions, tensions around international waterways, and the use of sanctions or political interference related to petroleum trade. Drawing on his experience as a petroleum economist, John illuminates the petroleum-related reasons for government actions usually camouflaged and rarely discussed publicly.
With reflections by Dr. Angela Carter, Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs Fellow.
Oil and World Politics: The real story of today’s conflict zones: Iraq, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Ukraine and more will be available for sale courtesy of Words Worth Books.
About the speaker
John Foster has spent his working life as a petroleum economist. He has more than 40 years’ experience in policy and economic issues relating to infrastructure and petroleum. While holding positions with the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, Petro-Canada and BP group, he witnessed first-hand the impact of petroleum geopolitics in more than 30 countries around the world.
Angela Carter’s research has focused on environmental policy regimes surrounding oil extraction in Canada’s primary oil producing provinces: Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Saskatchewan. Her recent publications analyzed government policy approaches and social movement opposition to fracking, as well as provincial oil sector emissions policy. She is now extending this work in an international comparative project on supply-side climate policy. She is particularly intrigued by the rise of “keep it in the ground” movements and legislation.
 
This event is co-sponsored by the Peace and Conflict Studies Association of Canada (PACS-Can) and LSPRIG: Laurier Student Public Interest Research Group.

Mar
5
Tue
2019
Documentary Filmmaking and Migration
Mar 5 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Rescheduled from February 12th.
 
Since moving to the American Southwest four years ago, Lisa Molomot has been exploring stories about immigration in her documentaries. These recent works involve migrant workers in Arizona, an interior immigration checkpoint in Texas, and an asylum seeker from Honduras who ends up at the Eloy Detention Center in Arizona.
Lisa is also collaborating with Dr. Alison Mountz on a feature documentary, filmed in British Columbia, Ontario, Colorado and Arizona, about U.S. war resisters who came to Canada in search of safe haven during the Vietnam and Iraq wars.
In her talk, Lisa will share her experiences of and challenges relating to access and ethics in making documentaries in the age of Trump, and will screen short clips of her films.
About the speaker
Lisa Molomot is a Tucson-based educator and filmmaker who teaches at the University of Arizona’s School of Theater, Film and Television and the James E. Rogers College of Law. Her award-winning documentary School’s Out is a portrait of a forest kindergarten in Switzerland, has had over 75 screenings internationally and been featured on slate.com, in The Atlantic, and on NPR; her first feature THE HILL tells the story of an immigrant neighborhood in New Haven, CT.
Lisa’s recent work has focused on immigration; as part of a course she co-taught with immigration lawyer Nina Rabin, she created a short film called The Cleaners about the labor issues faced by migrant workers in Arizona; she is currently working on another short film through the law school about a female Central American refugee who spent time at Eloy Detention Center; her feature documentary Missing in Brooks County, currently in post-production, is a portrait of a small Texas town dealing with a migrant death crisis; and, as a Fulbright scholar at the IMRC, Lisa is editing the feature documentary Canada: A Safe Haven? with her collaborator Dr. Alison Mountz.

Mar
7
Thu
2019
How Progressive is Canada’s “Progressive Trade Agenda”? A Gendered Analysis
Mar 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

The Canadian federal government of Justin Trudeau has espoused a “progressive trade agenda” in its pursuit of international free trade agreements (FTAs). In particular, it has committed itself to integrating gender chapters into new FTAs, as well as commitments to consultation and incorporation of provisions regarding labour, the environment, and Indigenous rights. Many researchers, activists and members of civil society have challenged the progressiveness of the approach, arguing that this claim is simply window dressing and “pinkwashing” for what continue to be pro-corporate trade deals. This presentation evaluates the claims of the current government around the promotion of the PTA with specific attention to the recent re-negotiation of NAFTA. Drawing upon Nancy Fraser’s concept of “progressive neoliberalism,” Dr. Macdonald argues that “progressiveness” is a key element in how the Liberal government seeks to brand their approach to trade policy and distinguish it from the policies of their Conservative predecessors. Laura also presents perspectives from civil society actors about what a more truly progressive approach would look like.
About the speaker
Laura Macdonald is a Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Political Economy at Carleton University. She has published numerous articles in journals and edited collections on such issues as the role of non-governmental organizations in development, global civil society, social policies and citizenship struggles in Latin America, Canadian development assistance, Canada-Latin American relations and the political impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Her recent work looks at transnational activism in North America around labour rights, migration, and human rights in Mexico, and policies to reduce crime and violence in Mexico City.

Disarming Myths about Women, Weapons and War
Mar 7 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

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Disarmament and arms control, security, and related fields have been and continue to be traditionally male-dominated fields. Organizations such as the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) work to challenge these norms and address issues of gender, militarism, peace and security by empowering citizen-led initiatives to enact changes within political frameworks. As part of CIGI’s programming around International Women’s Day, we invite you to join us for an evening with Allison Pytlak, Manager for Reaching Critical Will, the disarmament program of the WILPF. Allison will explore contributions of women to peace building, disarmament, and arms control, Canada’s recent leadership role on this front, and reflect on her experiences in both the UN and multilateral contexts.
About the speaker
Allison Pytlak is the Programme Manager for Reaching Critical Will. She contributes to the organisation’s monitoring and analysis of disarmament processes as well as its research and other publications, as well as liaises with UN, government, and civil society colleagues. Prior to this role, Allison worked in policy and advocacy with the Control Arms coalition focusing on the Arms Trade Treaty. She has also worked with Religions for Peace and Mines Action Canada on a broader range of arms issues, and has significant experience in campaigning and advocacy, research and writing, project management and multilateral treaty negotiations. Allison has a BA in International Relations from the University of Toronto and an MA, also in International Relations, from the City University of New York. She is an expert with the Forum on the Arms Trade and a 2018 UN Women Metro-NY “Champion of Change”.
Co-hosted with the Centre for International Governance Innovation.

Mar
11
Mon
2019
Disrupting Crisis, Unsettling Urgency: An Indigenous Criticism of Assumptions about Time in Environmental Advocacy
Mar 11 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Climate change activism and scientific assessments often emphasizes that humans must grasp the urgency of taking swift and decisive actions to address an environmental crisis. Yet many such conceptions of urgency obscure the factors that Indigenous peoples have called out as the most pressing concerns about climate justice. This obfuscation explains, in part, why climate change advocacy remains largely unrelated to Indigenous efforts to achieve justice and engage in decolonial actions. Kyle Whyte will show why a politics of urgency can be based in assumptions about the relationship among time (temporality) and environmental change that are antithetical to allyship with Indigenous peoples. He will contrast the temporality of urgency with some Indigenous traditions of temporality that center moral qualities of kinship relationships, such as consent, trust and reciprocity, and suggest that such Indigenous traditions articulate crucial conditions for climate and environmental justice, moving forward.
About the speaker
Kyle Whyte is the Timnick Chair in the Humanities and a professor in the departments of Philosophy and Community Sustainability at Michigan State University. His research addresses moral and political issues concerning climate policy and Indigenous peoples, the ethics of cooperative relationships between Indigenous peoples and science organizations, and problems of Indigenous justice in public and academic discussions of food sovereignty, environmental justice, and the anthropocene. He is an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Kyle is involved in a number of projects and organizations that advance Indigenous research methodologies, including the Climate and Traditional Knowledges Workgroup, Sustainable Development Institute of the College of Menominee Nation, Tribal Climate Camp, and Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga New Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence. He is a recipient of the Bunyan Bryant Award for Academic Excellence from Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice.

Mar
12
Tue
2019
U.S.-Vietnamese Climate Security Cooperation
Mar 12 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Vietnam is among the globe’s top ten countries most negatively affected by climate change and extreme weather events. How has the United States partnered with state and local actors in Vietnam to increase climate security and reduce Hanoi’s vulnerability? Is it enough?
About the speaker
Robert. K. Brigham, Shirley Ecker Boskey Professor of History and International Relations, joined the Vassar College faculty in 1994. He is a specialist on the history of US foreign relations. He is author or co-author of nine books, among them Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam (PublicAffairs, 2018); Iraq, Vietnam, and the Limits of American Power (PublicAffairs, 2008); and Argument Without End: In Search of Answers to the Vietnam Tragedy (PublicAffairs, 1999), written with former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara and James G. Blight of the University of Waterloo at the Balsillie School. Brigham’s current research interest is the nexus between security and climate change.

Mar
13
Wed
2019
Roundtable: International Financial Institutions and Asian Regional Cooperation and Integration
Mar 13 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

By invitation only.
BSIA faculty and students are invited to join Kris Panday, Canada’s Executive Director at the Asian Development Bank, for a roundtable discussion on international financial institutions and Asian regional cooperation and integration.
Radha Krishna Panday was appointed to the Board of Directors of the Asian Development Bank in April 2018. In this capacity, he represents Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, The Netherlands, Norway and Sweden. Previously, he was seconded to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as Director General of the Market Access Secretariat, with responsibility for the management of bilateral relations, market access issues, and market development activities. Prior to that assignment, Mr. Panday served as Minister (Commercial) at the Canadian Embassy in Beijing. Previous overseas assignments have included Dubai, as Canada’s first Consul General, Washington DC, as Minister-Counsellor (Congressional Relations), Seoul, as Counsellor (Market Access), and Singapore, as Trade Commissioner. Headquarters assignments have included Director, Softwood Lumber Division, and Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister of International Trade. Mr. Panday is a career member of the Canadian Foreign Service.
Mr. Panday holds a BA (Economics and Political Science) and an MA (Economics), both from the University of Toronto.
For more information, or to attend, email Dr. Andrew Thompson at asthompson@balsillieschool.ca.

Mar
14
Thu
2019
Iraq and the Federalization Process – 2005 to Today
Mar 14 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

The 2005 Iraqi Constitution put forward a shift in the Iraq state model from a centralized system to a decentralized fiscal federal model. This demanded the need for civil service workers in the provinces to learn new skills and for politicians to approach power relations in Iraq differently. What has happened since is a push and pull between the center and the periphery on different issues of centralized control and decentralized authorities. This talk will discuss the current state of play of Iraqi politics and federalism and how it got there, what state-building looks like in reality, and what role international organizations can play.
About the speaker
Mike Fleet is a Senior Researcher with the Institute on Governance, Mike works with the Iraq Team where he helps to implement the Fiscal Federalism, Decentralization and Resiliency Building Project. His research focus is on Iraqi politics, federalism, state-building, and conflict dynamics. Mike completed a Master of Arts degree in Global Governance from the Balsillie School of International Affairs at the University of Waterloo, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Food Metrics 3.0: Unearthing Hidden Data
Mar 14 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

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Since 2011, the New York City’s Mayor’s Office of Food Policy has released a Food Metrics Report which provides a snapshot of data from across City agencies on food-related programming and trends. The report has expanded every year to include the broad range of programs and initiatives that the City is doing to address food insecurity; improve City food procurement and food service, increase healthy food access and awareness, and support a more sustainable and just food system. In a review of New York City’s 2018 Food Metrics Report, Dr. Nevin Cohen and his team at the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute, identified a number of food metrics that would deepen our understanding of the food system and yet are often overlooked. These hidden food metrics—that are produced by city agencies but often buried in low-profile documents—could be used by interested citizens, policymakers, and advocates to monitor important aspects of the food system, lobby for new resources, support effective initiatives, and design and implement complementary programs. In this talk, Cohen will discuss these hidden food metrics and what they can tell us about the food system.
The talk will be followed by a Q&A with Barbara Emanuel from the Toronto Public Health’s Toronto Food Strategy.
Registration is required.
A reception with light refreshments will follow talk.
About the speaker
Nevin Cohen is Associate Professor at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School of Public Health, and Research Director of CUNY’s Urban Food Policy Institute. His scholarship explores the policies, governance systems, practices, and infrastructure to support socially just, healthy, ecologically resilient, and economically viable urban and regional food systems.
Current projects include a five-country analysis of urban agriculture, research on food retail access; a study of the intersections of zoning, planning, and food gentrification; the effects of social equity policies on food systems; and an evaluation of the effects of urban farms in New York City Housing Authority developments. Dr. Cohen is the co-author of a recently published book, Beyond the Kale: urban agriculture and social justice activism in New York City (University of GA Press) that examines the potential of urban farms and gardens to address racial, gender, and class oppression. He has a PhD in Urban Planning and Policy Development from Rutgers University, a master’s in city and Regional Planning from Berkeley, and a BA from Cornell.
About the moderator
Barbara Emanuel is the Manager of the Toronto Food Strategy. Led by Toronto Public Health, the strategy proposes a new vision for Toronto’s food – one that integrates health and city building. The intent is to build food connections across and within city divisions, between city government and community and between multiple food system stakeholders, with the goal of a healthy and sustainable food system for all. The food strategy builds on the strong foundation of the Toronto Food Policy Council which has operated for more than 27 years.
Prior to her work on the food strategy, Barbara was the Strategic Policy Advisor to the Medical Officer of Health for Toronto where she worked on a range of local and global public health and environmental issues including food and nutrition. Barbara has worked for the City of Toronto for over 25 years in a variety of policy and strategic issues roles.
Before working for the City of Toronto, Barbara worked at the Development Education Centre, an adult education resource centre dedicated to international development and capacity building issues
Unable to attend in-person? Register to be notified when the video recording of the event has been made available.

Mar
15
Fri
2019
2019 Prospective Student Open House
Mar 15 @ 1:00 pm – 4:30 pm

By Invitation Only
The Balsillie School welcomes prospective students to tour the campus, and meet faculty, alumni and current students.
 
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Mar
25
Mon
2019
Global Health: Bridging the Disciplinary Divides Workshop
Mar 25 @ 8:00 am – Mar 26 @ 5:00 pm

The BSIA is hosting a two day workshop from March 25-26, 2019. The theme of the workshop is “Global Health: Bridging the Disciplinary Divides.” The objective of the workshop is to examine how different disciplines approach, analyse and understand key global health challenges; if and how these different approaches impede research and policy progress; and how to overcome interdisciplinary divisions to make progress in research and policy on global health issues. We hope that the outcomes of the conference will include journal articles as well as the establishment of an International Consortium on Social Science and Global Health.
The workshop will begin with a plenary session to discuss the challenges of interdisciplinary research as well as policy action. It then will break into three smaller thematic groups: mental health, governance of medicines, and the deliberate targeting of health workers during violent conflict.
The organizers include Karen Grepin (BSIA), Valerie Percival (NPSIA), Amy Patterson (University of the South), Garrett Wallace Brown (Leeds), Owain Williams (University of Queensland), and James Orbinski (York University). The workshop is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Balsillie School of International Affairs, the University of Leeds, the University of the South, and Carleton University.
We would be pleased to welcome participation from BSIA faculty and PhD students with interests in interdisciplinary research, global health research, or any of the associated themes. There is no formal presentation required for your participation. Prior to the workshop, participants will be sent a list of questions to address, such as: What are the key research challenges in your field? How does your discipline study this issue? What are the key policy challenges? What are the key obstacles to progress in both research and policy? How do interdisciplinary challenges affect research, as well as policy or programs?
If you are interested in participating, please contact one of the workshop organizers, Amber Warnat at AmberWarnat@cmail.carleton.ca, who will provide you with the agenda and other details on the workshop.

Apr
25
Thu
2019
Fifth BSIA Global Political Economy Dissertation Workshop
Apr 25 @ 8:00 am – Apr 26 @ 5:00 pm

By Invitation Only
The Global Political Economy/WatPEG Research Cluster is hosting this dissertation workshop to provide selected PhD students the opportunity to present work in progress to an interdisciplinary audience of faculty and students. For more information about the selection process (now closed), see the Call for Proposals.
Participating Faculty (preliminary list):
John Abraham, Wilfrid Laurier University
Andrea Collins, University of Waterloo
Patricia Goff, Wilfrid Laurier University
Derek Hall, Wilfrid Laurier University
Eric Helleiner, University of Waterloo
Pierre Siklos, Wilfrid Laurier University
Larry Swatuk, University of Waterloo
Heather Whiteside, University of Waterloo
Randy Wigle, Wilfrid Laurier University